Dantian Breath Work

Dantian Breath Work 2017-07-15T11:17:38+00:00
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  • QiBody
    Keymaster
    Post count: 26
    #12293 |

    Dan is the area of the body in the lower abdomen where Qi is generated. Tian is the field of Qi that has been generated by and surrounds the Dan. Dantian breathing technique is the transference of attention from the mind and breath to the lower dantian via the will. The mind must be empty and alert to send the Qi and breath to the root (lower dantian). When the mind is stabilized in the root it can be full and substantial.

    In dantian breathing we direct the breath with calm, focused mind into the lower dantian, and located about 2 finger widths below the navel and three finger widths deep. The lower dantian or energy field (aka “the field of elixir”) is an area where Qi is generated, sublimated and stored. Attention placed here means focusing on our center of gravity and the essence of life.

  • QiBody
    Keymaster
    Post count: 26

    What is your personal take on the difference between the Abdominal Breathing you use in your system and Reverse Abdominal Breathing?

  • QiBody
    Keymaster
    Post count: 26

    They are definitely different techniques and one usually learns dantain breathing as shown in the video, first. Reverse breathing comes later and might be considered more advanced. Dantian breathing is more natural and necessary to focus the attention and Qi into lower dantian where at the beginning we want it to gather. This is how we wake up the potential in lower dantian. Reverse breathing takes more control and ability to draw Qi from above and below into dantian and then expand it into lower dantian.
    Not a beginner technique.
    Also, I like the questions, don’t shy away from asking anything even if you think it is silly. This is an internal art and much is invisible, so ask away!

    I copied this from the web:
    Several people from this list and in workshops have recently asked Dennis Lewis about the value of “reverse abdominal breathing,” which is a common practice in Taoism (as well as in other traditions). Dennis thought it would be useful to include a section here on this subject from his book “The Tao of Natural Breathing.”
    “Reverse abdominal breathing, traditionally called Taoist breathing, reverses the natural in-and-out movements of the abdomen that one finds in natural breathing. In reverse breathing, the abdomen contracts inward during inhalation and relaxes outward during exhalation. Though reverse breathing offers many of the benefits of natural breathing because of its similar emphasis on moving the abdomen, it is traditionally used by chi kung practitioners, healers, and martial artists to help draw energy deep into their tissues and bones, as well as to direct energy–for storage, for action, or for healing–to any part of their organism. It is also used to build up what is called “guardian chi,” a protective shield of energy around the body that helps ward off negative influences, including bacteria and viruses dangerous to our health. It is thus especially useful to help immune system functioning.
    Part of the reason for the great power of this practice is the change in the pressure differential between the chest and abdomen. When the diaphragm moves downward and the belly contracts inward during inhalation, the resulting pressure in the abdomen helps “pack” the breath energy into the abdominal tissues and organs, as well as into the spine. When the diaphragm relaxes upward and the belly relaxes outward during exhalation, the sudden release of pressure guides the energy outward wherever one’s attention is directed. It is therefore extremely important when undertaking reverse breathing to be clear about where one puts one’s attention.
    Otherwise one’s energy may be quickly lost.

    In spite of its many benefits, reverse breathing should only be undertaken when one is quite comfortable with natural abdominal breathing. Without this level of comfort, most people who attempt reverse breathing tense their faces, necks, and chests and draw their diaphragms upward as they inhale. This not only negates the positive effects of the practice, but can also lead to a variety of problems, including chest pain, diarrhea, an increase in heartbeat or blood pressure, and energy stagnation. It can also lead to mental and emotional confusion and a scattering of the energy of awareness. …”

  • QiBody
    Keymaster
    Post count: 26

    When you explained the spark plug analogy regarding the hui yin and bringing the dantian back, I recognized that reverse dantian breathing’s inbreath compresses the energy while the spark plug is connected, drawing and compressing simultaneously while the outbreath of RDB is… spinning/exciting the accumulated qi? Keeping it fresh and flowing so it doesn’t stagnate? Would you consider this accurate?

  • QiBody
    Keymaster
    Post count: 26

    Not to my experience. Dantian breathing on it’s own is drawing Qi into the organs and clearing stagnation. And it is safe!

    The best way to assimilate Qibody Cultivation is to see it as the corner stones, the foundation of a true alchemical practice. It may appear simple because most people are practicing advanced techniques without a proper base or an awakened lower dantian. They are practicing with their imagination or mental Qi sans a real connection to their body essence. Mind , breath and essence need to be unified.
    The best way to practice is with clarity and focused attention to the technique. Let the learning come from the practice instead of trying to bring what you already know to the practice.
    Practice the Dantian breathing as a meditation on it’s own. It is a wonderful practice to do before you even get out of bed or before you go to sleep. If you have a partner, you can each put a hand on the others dantian to help guide the Qi. It will be mutually healing and you will begin to notice what Qi in the dantian feels like. This is essential for later healing work. I lay hands on every new student to assess where their Qi is going when they breathe. You might be surprised to find that even people who think they breathe deeply, aren’t bringing Qi deeply into their body. This is because they are not intending to draw Qi into lower dantian and so they are just doing diaphragmatic breathing. That is great, but it is not building Qi.
    The Hui yin (spark plug) exercises in the video are for the beginner and won’t be needed after a bit. It is to assist in establishing a mental connection to hui yin center. All of tese connections are part of the hook up, if you will, and need to be pure. Capish.

  • QiBody
    Keymaster
    Post count: 26

    I just watched the three part Neigong techniques video which was wonderfully clear. I did have a question on that. I’ve been taught to do reverse breathing, meaning the abdomen slightly tucks in on inhale, and expands on exhale. I do this naturally now. Can I do this form of breathing when awakening the bubbling springs and perineum as shown on your videos ? Or should I do normal style breathing like you for these exercises.

  • QiBody
    Keymaster
    Post count: 26

    It is natural that when drawing up from the earth using Hui yin, that the pelvic floor gently elevators upward and dantian elongates or seems to move inward. In the video, on the exhale, I am asking you to let the Qi drop back into the earth or as in the 3rd technique to draw Qi back to ming men. The main purpose of learning the dantian breathing as I demonstrate it is to establish a connection of the breath and mind that nourishes and brings Qi into the dantian. Reverse breathing is an advanced method and should be learned after really understanding the method I describe in the first DVD of QiBody Cultivation.
    So many practitioners learn advanced techniques without having set up the proper foundation and that will stunt the internal alchemy wich requires the right beginning.
    If you can, practice like a complete beginner to learn for yourself what each new technique feels like and ask plenty of questions so that I can do my best to guide you.

  • Awakener
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    I’ve recently switched my focus from cultivation and back to the breath work because I had felt it wasn’t fully connected with the dantian. Through focus on breath alone, I’ve come across a thing or two that I’d like to verify.

    If “Shoulder Breathing” could be described as 70% “Up Breathing” and 30% “Up and Out Breathing”, would “Abdominal Breathing” be described as 80% “Down and Out Breathing” and 20% “Down Breathing” when specifically “Dantian Breathing” could be described as 80% “Down Breathing” and 20% “Down and Out Breathing”?

    Here I’m describing the motion of the body and where the breath goes. If the breath goes up, your shoulder moves, if your breath goes up and Out, your chest expands, if it goes down and out, your stomach expands, but would dantian breathing be focusing the breath more about directly down? rather than trying to get the area below the naval to expand?

    When I try to “lower my abdominal breathing” I have trouble getting the breath to drop below the naval, but I Think I’m feeling that “filling crucible” sensation when not focusing on the stomach expanding but trying to breathe Down rather than Down and Out (stomach expansion).

  • QiBody
    Keymaster
    Post count: 26

    Okay, now I understand. Let your mind and breath enter the area below navel and within. that is sufficient at the beginning. As the Qi begins to increase in your lower dantian it will naturally feel expanded and may even actually look expanded. There is no need to force that expansion. What you are feeling is perfect, down is right. the expansion will take care of itself as your body relaxes more and the Qi starts to gather and build.

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